Kelham Island Museum, Sheffield.

I visited Kelham Island Museum back in October. The museum had remained closed during the pandemic. However, they were finally able to re-open with COVID safe implementations in place. The museum are using the track and trace app and have a one way system in place with social distancing. If you head to their website, they recommend booking tickets in advance. Adult entry is £7. Sadly, the River Don Engine was not performing shows, which is understandable.

I love Kelham Island, there is a lot to see and the Island Cafe/Bar does awesome food and coffee. A lot of Sheffield’s industrial history is now inside the museum. It is a wonderful place to remember what made Sheffield the city it is today.

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Abbey Pumping Station Museum, Leicestershire.

I was visiting the National Space Centre and noticed this free little museum next door. Out of curiosity, I went inside to have a look. To my amazement, the museum was full of interesting stuff both inside and out. If I am honest, I enjoyed it more than the Space Centre.

The Victorian building was constructed in 1891 by Leicester Corporation and was designed by Stockdale Harrison (Leicester architect) in 1890, alongside the River Soar, as a pumping station used to pump the town’s sewage to the sewage farm at Beaumont Leys. The station continued pumping Leicester’s sewage until 1964, when electric pumps took over. Within a few years the Wanlip Sewage Treatment plant took over and the pumping station was no longer needed.

http://www.abbeypumpingstation.org/

Frontier Historical Museum, Glenwood Springs, Colorado.

I was clearing out my phone as the memory is almost full and I found a few pictures of the Frontier Historical Museum so I thought I would write a little post. I apologies for the poor quality phone pictures!

The natural hot spring water was first used by the Utes, who believed that it was sacred. When the white settlers began to migrate from the East, the springs soon became a tourist destination. President Theodore Roosevelt, Molly Brown, Buffalo Bill Cody and Doc Holliday, have all stayed at the springs.

Museum Website

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Thorpe Camp Museum

Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire.

https://thorpecamp.wixsite.com/visitorscentre

Thorpe Camp, officially known as the Thorpe Camp Visitor Centre, is part of the former Royal Air Force barracks for RAF Woodhall Spa.

The buildings that today make up the Centre were formerly part of the No.1 Communal Site, which was built in 1940. In 1998, the camp was made into a visitor centre by the Thorpe Camp Preservation Group.

Woodhall Spa and the surrounding area has a long history connected to the RAF. The 97, 619, 617 (Dambusters) and 627 Squadrons were based at RAF Woodhall Spa.

For a more in-depth look around the Thorpe Camp, please watch my video below.

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Can anyone tell me what these posts are?

Before you visit, check their website for opening days and times as these have changed due to COVID.

South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum, Doncaster.

https://www.southyorkshireaircraftmuseum.org.uk/

Amongst many other sectors, the heritage sector, especially small independent museums have suffered greatly due to COVID, so it is nice to be able to try and support as many as possible now they are re-opening.

The South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum is quite hidden away at the back of the popular Lakeside area of Doncaster. The buildings once formed part of RAF Doncaster, which the museum took over when they were vacated by Yorkshire Water.

There is loads to see and some great displays. They don’t just have aircraft, they also have lots of other history on the military.

It is definitely worth a visit. Parking is free, there is plenty of space for social distancing and they have put one way systems in place.

Below are a few pictures from my visit. Thanks for reading.

Hawker BAE
Westland Seaking HAS.6 XV677
A few aircraft on display outside.
Hangar displays
Hangar displays
Wartime Store

As of 2020, admissions were:

Adult £6.50

Children (5-16) £3

Senior Citizen £5.50

Family £15

Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration in New York USA

I have wanted to visit Ellis Island since learning about immigration during my undergraduate degree. I finally got there in 2019, and I certainly was not disappointed.

Ellis Island first opened its doors in 1892 and closed in 1954. At its peak, approximately 5,000-10,000 immigrants passed through Ellis Island every day. It is estimated that about 12 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island during the time of its operation.

Several laws and legislation were put in place to restrict immigration starting in 1882, with the Chinese Exclusion Act. This was followed in 1894, by the Immigration Restriction League and the Dillingham Commission in 1911. In 1917, literacy tests were introduced meaning that immigrants had to pass reading and writing tests in order to be granted entry to the US. This meant that many poorer immigrants, especially those from eastern Europe, with no education failed the tests and were denied entry.

The Immigrant Quota Act of 1921, restricted immigrant numbers to 357,000 per year, and the National Origins Act of 1924 reduced immigration even further to 150,000 per year. A culmination of these resulted in Ellis Island becoming redundant and finally closing its doors in 1954.

On the 11th of May 1965, Ellis Island became part of the National Park Service and in 1976, Ellis Island opened to the public. In 1984, it was renovated with $160 million from donations made to The Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Foundation, Inc. in partnership with the National Park Service. The project was completed in 1990, and Ellis Island reopened to the public.

Below are a few pictures that I took whilst visiting Ellis Island along with a video for a more in-depth look inside the buildings.  I tried to include as much of the museum as I could on the video for those people who can not get there in person. 

 

The Great Hall.

Located on the 1st Floor is the Baggage Room, Journeys: The Peopling of America 1550-1890, Journeys: New Eras of Immigration 1945- Present, and the American Family Immigration History Center. On the 2nd Floor there is the Registry Room (Great Hall), the Hearing Room, Theater 2, and two exhibit galleries: Through America’s Gate and Peak Immigration Years: 1880-1924. Finally, located on the 3rd floor there is the Bob Hope Memorial Library, Dormitory Room, and the exhibits: Ellis Island Chronicles, Treasures From Home, Silent Voices, and Restoring a Landmark.

The museum has a lot to look around and take in so leave yourself plenty of time. Definitely buy tickets in advance.  Tickets start at $18.50 and also include Liberty Island https://www.statuecruises.com/statue-liberty-and-ellis-island-tickets/  

I would definitely advise you to book an early security check (the ticket time is your security check time, not your ferry time). I arrived at 8.30 am (my ticket time was 9 am) and there was no line so I got straight through. By the time I returned from the island, just after lunch time the queue was huge.

There is a free audio guide also included in your ticket price.  On both Liberty Island and Ellis Island there are cafe’s, but the food could definitely be improved, they only seemed to serve fast food. I was there in the morning and there were no breakfast options.  

Ellis Island is open every day except the fourth Thursday in November (Thanksgiving) and December 25.

More information on the history of Ellis Island can be found here and here.

Thanks for reading. 

http://www.shutterstock.com/g/Elizabethmaher?rid=2892667

Quick Stop at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

The main reason that I visited the MET whist I was in New York was to look for a staircase that was once located inside Scarsdale Hall in Derbyshire.  I think I covered just about all of the museum but unfortunately, I could not seem to find the staircase anywhere. 

The MET is gigantic and you need at least a day to look around the museum and if you want to read everything, probably a week.  The museum is so big they have the whole facade of a building located in the American Wing, in the The Charles Engelhard Court (picture below). 

I only took photographs on my phone so the quality is not great. There is also a short video at the end of the open storage, which I thought was a great idea as most museums do not let the public access their storage. 

The MET first opened on February 20, 1872, at 681 Fifth Avenue.  In 1871, the museum was granted land between the East Park Drive, Fifth Avenue, and the 79th and 85th Street in Central Park, which is where it resides today. The building has over 2,000,000 square feet of floor space and is 20 times the size of the original building.

Just a few things to note before you go. I got there at about 9.50 am, the museum opens at 10 am and there was a queue of people already waiting for the museum to open. Once the doors open, the queues went down pretty quickly. There are machines inside the main entrance where you can buy tickets, or you can buy them in advance online.  

A visitor admiring the facade of the Branch Bank of the United States (details below).
Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), Jackson Pollock (American, Cody, Wyoming 1912–1956 East Hampton, New York).
From Williamsburg Bridge , Edward Hopper (American, Nyack, New York 1882–1967 New York).
Merced River, Yosemite Valley, 1866, Albert Bierstadt (American, Solingen 1830–1902 New York).

I was especially interested in the whole rooms that the MET had on display. Unfortunately, only one of the pictures came out on my phone.

Boiserie from the Hôtel de Cabris, Grasse.

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