Abandoned Storr’s Bridge Works (Loxley, Sheffield)

WOW! What a place this is and I am really happy that I got to see it before it gets demolished, even though I know that I am a little late to the party. 28 Days Later and Derelict Places have lots of reports on this place, going back a few years, so you can take a look at how the place has deteriorated.

The footprint of this place is huge, the site was owned by Bovis Homes who bought the site back in 2006. They had planned to put 500 homes on the site. However, local opposition halted plans stating that the area could not sustain that many new homes, which I agree with 100%. I believe that discussions are underway once again to build on the site, but the plans have been scaled down. I personally think that the site should be made into some sort of nature reserve as it is located in a quiet valley surrounded by countryside.

The factory is known locally as the Storr’s Bridge Works. However, I believe that it has been occupied over the years by a few different companies, including Thomas Marshall and Co,  Hepworths and Carblox. The valley of Loxley supplied bricks to the Sheffield steel industry, beginning in the 1800s and ceasing in the 1990s. The area was rich in ganister which came from the Stannington pot clay seam. There were multiple mines in the area (I believe one may remain but I have yet to find it).

The factory closed when the demand for produce decreased alongside the decline of the steel industry in Sheffield.

There is hardly anything left of the factory today. Most of the interiors have been removed and what is left has been trashed. People have done a great deal of fly-tipping on the site also, which the council have failed to clean up.

The site is located along a public footpath and whilst there are some signs up that say “do not enter” the site is easily accessible due to the temporary fencing being removed in parts. There is some great graffiti (and some not so great) on the buildings. The most interesting part of the site was being able to walk through what I think are the old furnaces.

If anyone reading this worked at the factory, please comment and share your memories as I would love to hear them.

If lockers could talk. I bet these have heard some stories.

The Mystery of the Creepy Coastal House.

I tried to recall from my many visits to the area if this house has always been derelict. However, I could not remember. The house is situated along a public footpath, a route popular with walkers and joggers. Despite the boarding on the windows, there are no fences up, no private, or no trespassing signs. I find it strange that a house in such a beautiful area is derelict.

In the garden, there is an old, rusty lawnmower and some plant pots that grass has now grown over. It appears that the gardens were once carefully maintained. There is a small outhouse containing some rubbish and a catalogue from the 1980s. It looks like maybe this house has not been touched for some time.

There is no glass in the windows, but there is a small gap in the boarding that I managed to poke my GoPro through. When I looked at the video (linked above), the inside of the house is ransacked. Perhaps someone broke in and looked through whatever was left for anything valuable. From the interiors, I think the house has been derelict for some time.

I have scoured the internet, but I cannot find any information relating to the history of the house. I wondered what its initial purpose was. It is situated away from the other residential homes around the port. I wondered if this building was either a watch house or a fisherman’s house. The stairs at the rear, that provide access to the upstairs level made me think that it served another purpose than just being a residence. Perhaps someone elderly lived in the house and after they passed away, there was no-one to inherit the property, so it was left.

For now, it remains a mystery.

Llanlleiana Old Porcelain Works, Anglesey.

There does not appear to be a great deal of history written on Llanlleiana. From what I have read, the works processed deposits of china clay found on Dinas Gynfor into porcelain. The works were relatively small, consisting of only one building and the remote chimney. The works closed in 1920 after they were damaged by fire.

If you know any more info on the works, please leave me a comment.

For a look around the works, please watch my video below.

Thanks for reading.

Main Building
Remote chimney on the hillside.

Seldom Seen Engine House in Sheffield, England.

Hidden away in the Moss Valley lies the remains of Seldom Seen Engine House. The engine house was once part of Plumbley Colliery. According to the publication North Derbyshire Collieries, Plumbley Colliery was sunk in about 1860 and closed in 1901.

There are two theories about how the engine house got it’s name. One is that the engine house was so hidden away it was ‘seldom seen’. The other theory is that the engine house was haunted and the ghost was seldom seen. I think the first is the more logical explanation as Plumbley Colliery was also known as the Seldom Seen Colliery. However, I prefer the latter.

Today the engine house is a Scheduled Ancient Monument as it is an unusually large and rare example of an engine house. There isn’t much left of the interior, it looks like the council have just used the inside to dump old signs, which is a shame. Some interpretation would be nice, it’s another one of Sheffield’s forgotten places sadly.

On the 16th of March in 1895, Percey Riley, 9, Esther Ann Riley, 11, and Rebecca Godson, 9, were playing on a cooling pond belonging to the colliery that had frozen over. The ice broke and the children fell into the freezing water.  A 24-year-old engine man Alfred Williamson heard the children screaming and jumped into the pond to rescue them. Alfred and the children sadly drowned as they were unable to swim.  Alfred’s headstone, which is also engraved with the names of the children resides in Eckington Churchyard.

At the time of the children’s death, their families could not afford headstones. In 2020, a local fundraising campaign by Natural Eckington raised enough money to place a headstone for each child in Eckington churchyard, there was also a service to remember the children and Alfred.

There doesn’t appear to be much more information about the colliery online, if you have any more info, please leave a note in the comments.

Thanks for reading.

Grade I listed St Peter and St Paul’s Church, Eckington
War memorial

Sources and further reading:

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1017746

https://www.derbyshiretimes.co.uk/news/people/forgotten-children-who-died-eckington-colliery-accident-be-remembered-125-years-later-1887992